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2008 By The Numbers

by: Jill Richardson

Fri Jan 02, 2009 at 23:34:18 PM PST


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I went back and looked at a bunch of numbers from 2008. Unfortunately, the economic numbers are pretty bleak (and still getting worse).

U.S. Population:
January 2008: 302,785,808
December 2008: 305,313,980

Unemployment:
January 2008: 4.9%
November 2008: 6.7%

Inflation (Nov 2007-Nov 2008):
All items: 1.1%
Food: 6.0%
Energy: -13.3%
All items less food & energy: 2.0%

Hunger (as of Dec 2007):
Food Insecurity: 11.1% of all U.S. Households
Hunger: 4.1% of all U.S. Households
Hungry Children: 691,000
*These numbers are expected to get worse in 2008, as unemployment went up and so did food prices. The numbers here are the most recent ones released by the USDA.

Jill Richardson :: 2008 By The Numbers
What We Eat
All data from USDA ERS 2008

All numbers are a percent of our total calories per capita per day
YearMeat/Nuts/EggsDairyFruitVegetables
1970
1980
1990
2000
2006
20.3%
19.5%
17.8%
16.8%
17.5%
13.3%
12.4%
12.0%
10.5%
10.4%
3.1%
3.5%
3.4%
3.3%
3.2%
5.7%
5.2%
5.1%
4.9%
4.7%

YearFlour and Cereal ProductsAdded FatsAdded SugarsTotal Calories
1970
1980
1990
2000
2006
20.0%
21.1%
23.7%
23.4%
22.9%
19.0%
19.9%
19.6%
22.7%
23.8%
18.6%
18.4%
18.4%
18.5%
17.5%
2,160
2,202
2,422
2,715
2,679

Find out more on:
Fruit Consumption Data
Veggie Consumption Data
Meat, Egg, Dairy, and Nut Consumption

Sweeteners (Calories Per Capita Per Day)

1970: 343.0 sugar, 53.6 corn sweeteners
1980: 281.9 sugar, 119.1 corn sweeteners
1990: 217.0 sugar, 225.3 corn sweeteners
2000: 220.9 sugar, 275.7 corn sweeteners
2006: 210.1 sugar, 252.8 corn sweeteners

(I assume the recent decrease in caloric sweeteners has a lot to do with the introduction of Splenda.)

Where We Buy Our Food
Outlet Type198619962006
Conventional Supermarkets65.358.257.7
Other Grocery
(Small, neighborhood stores)
14.315.83.4
Specialty Food Stores5.82.62.7
Supercenters and wholesale club stores
(SuperTarget, Wal-Mart Supercenter)
0.44.317.9
Mass merchandise stores
(Target, Wal-Mart)
1.52.11.7
Convenience Stores3.33.02.9
Home deliveries/mail order1.22.83.8
Farmers/processors/wholesalers2.01.90.8
Other Stores6.210.19.2
Source: USDA Report on Supply Chain and Food Marketing 2008

Farmers Markets, CSAs, and Roadside Stands
# of CSAs 1990: 60
# of CSAs 2007: 1150

States with the Most Farmers Markets (USDA AMS 2007)

  1. California
  2. New York
  3. Iowa
  4. Illinois
  5. Pennsylvania
  6. Wisconsin
  7. Michigan
  8. Massachusetts
  9. Ohio
  10. Kentucky

U.S. Demand for Locally Grown Food:
2002: $4 billion
2007: $5 billion
2012 (estimated): $7 billion

Indeed, the popularity of farmers markets has grown so rapidly in the United States that a recent national survey reports that 2 percent of U.S. food shoppers now say farmers markets are their primary food shopping venue.

Source: USDA Report on Supply Chain and Food Marketing 2008

Farm To School:
# of Programs: 2016
# of Schools: 8776

The Organic Outlook

Organic Food Sales
1990: $1 billion
2007: $20 billion (estimated)
2008: $23.6 billion (projected)
Source: Organic Trade Association 2008 mini-fact sheet

Organic Market Growth & Penetration
1998: 19.2% growth, 0.9% penetration
1999: 17.6% growth, 0.9% penetration
2000: 21.0% growth, 1.2% penetration
2001: 20.7% growth, 1.4% penetration
2002: 17.3% growth, 1.6% penetration
2003: 20.2% growth, 1.9% penetration

2004: 14.6% growth, 2.2% penetration
2005: 16.2% growth, 2.5% penetration
2006: 20.9% growth, 2.8% penetration
Source: Organic Trade Association 2007 Manufacturer Survey

In 2006, according to the Organic Trade Association, organic food market broke down as follows (numbers reflect percent of total organic sales):
Fruit & Veg: 40.0%
Dairy: 16.0%
Beverages: 13.0%
Packaged: 12.0%
Bread & Grains: 10.0%
Snack Foods: 4.8%
Sauces: 2.4%
Meat: 2.0%
Total: $16.718 billion (100%)

According to the Organic Trade Association, about 7 percent of U.S. organic food sales in 2005 occurred through direct sales at farmers markets and other nonretail direct market outlets (including sales to foodservice customers).  In contrast, only 3.9 percent of all U.S. food sales in 2005 were made through any form of direct sale or home/mail order delivery.

Source: USDA Report on Supply Chain and Food Marketing 2008

Obviously, the numbers aren't in for organics in 2008 just yet. Since the economy totally tanked, particularly in the last few months of the year, I think it's reasonable to expect the organic market to take a hit. However, from what I've heard, organics will continue to see growth, just not at the high levels they did in the past several years. Existing organic shoppers are committed and willing to find ways to keep buying organic (i.e. grow some at home, stop buying expensive packaged foods, etc). With the economic situation, it seems that the biggest hit to organics will be in new customers - those who haven't given organics a try yet, who may be struggling financially now and less willing than ever to pay more for their food.

GMOs
Percent of All U.S. Soybeans Planted that were GMO (herbicide tolerant):
2000: 54
2001: 68
2002: 75
2003: 81
2004: 85
2005: 87
2006: 89
2007: 91
2008: 92

Percent of All U.S. Upland Cotton Planted that is GMO:
2000: 61
2001: 69
2002: 71
2003: 73
2004: 76
2005: 79
2006: 83
2007: 87
2008: 86

Of all cotton planted in 2008, 18% was Bt cotton, 23% was herbicide tolerant, and 45% were "stacked gene varieties" (which I assume means both herbicide and pest resistant). Could the decrease in GMO cotton between 2007 and 2008 have anything to do with the increase in organic cotton in the last year?

Percent of All U.S. Corn Planted That is GMO:
2000: 25
2001: 26
2002: 34
2003: 40
2004: 45
2005: 52
2006: 61
2007: 73
2008: 80

Of all corn planted in 2008, 17% was Bt corn, 23% was herbicide tolerant, and 40% were "stacked gene varieties."

Source: Adoption of Genetically Engineered Crops in the U.S.

Obesity by State (2007)

30% and Up25%-29.9%20% to 24.9%Below 20%
1. Mississippi: 32.0%
2. Alabama: 30.3%
3. Tennessee: 30.1%
4. Louisiana: 29.8%
5. West Virginia: 29.5%
6. Arkansas: 28.7%
7. South Carolina: 28.4%
8. Georgia: 28.2%
9. Oklahoma: 28.1%
10. Texas: 28.1%
11. North Carolina: 28.0%
12. Michigan: 27.7%
13. Alaska: 27.5%
13. Missouri: 27.5%
13. Ohio: 27.5%
13. Rhode Island: 27.5%
17. Kentucky: 27.4%
17. Delaware: 27.4%
19. Pennsylvania: 27.1%
20. Iowa: 26.9%
20. Kansas: 26.9%
22. Indiana: 26.8%
23. North Dakota: 26.5%
24. South Dakota: 26.2%
25. Nebraska: 26.0%
26. Minnesota: 25.6%
27. Oregon: 25.5%
27. Arizona: 25.4%
27. Maryland: 25.4%
30. Washington: 25.3%
31. New York: 25.0%
32. Illinois: 24.9%
33. Maine: 24.8%
34. Wisconsin: 24.7%
35. Idaho: 24.5%
36. New Hampshire: 24.4%
37. Virginia: 24.3%
38. Nevada: 24.1%
39. New Mexico: 24.0%
40. Wyoming: 23.7%
41. Florida: 23.6%
42. New Jersey: 23.5%
43. California: 22.6%
44. Montana: 21.8%
44. Utah: 21.8%
44. Washington DC: 21.8%
47. Hawaii: 21.4%
48. Massachusetts: 21.3%
48. Vermont: 21.3%
50. Connecticut: 21.2%
51. Colorado: 18.7%

Industry Concentration

From CONCENTRATION OF AGRICULTURAL MARKETS April 2007 by Mary Hendrickson and William Heffernan

Note: CR4 is the concentration ratio (relative to 100%) of the top four firms in a specific food industry. An industry is considered consolidated if its CR4 is 40% or higher.

Beef Packers CR4
1990: 72%
1995: 76%
1998: 79%
2000: 81%
2005: 83.5%
2007: 83.5%
(Note: This increased in 2008 when JBS Swift bought Smithfield Foods, formerly the 5th largest beef packer.)
2007 Daily Slaughter Capacity
1. Tyson: 36,000 head
2. Cargill: 28,300 head
3. Swift & Co: 16,759 head
4. National Beef Packing Co: 13,000 head

Pork Packer CR4
1987: 37%
1989: 34%
1990: 40%
2001: 59%
2005: 64%
2007: 66%
2007 Daily Slaughter Capacity
1. Smithfield Foods: 102,900
2. Tyson Foods: 72,800
3. Swift & Co.: 46,000
4. Cargill: 36,000

Broiler Industry CR4
1986: 35%
1990: 44%
1994: 46%
1998: 49%
2001: 50%
2007: 58.5%
2007 Top Producers
1. Pilgrim's Pride
2. Tyson
3. Perdue
4. Sanderson Farms
Note: The CR2 in this sector is 47%.

Turkey Industry CR4
1998: 31%
1992: 35%
1996: 40%
2000: 45%
2005: 51%
2007: 55%
2007 Slaughter Capacity
1. Butterball LLC: 1,420 Million lbs
2. Hormel Foods (Jennie-O Turkey Store): 1,265 Million lbs
3. Cargill: 961 Million lbs
4. Sara Lee: 260 Million lbs

Ethanol Production CR4
1987: 73%
1995: 73%
1999: 67%
2002: 49%
2007: 31.5%

Million Gallons/Year (Capacity)
1. ADM: 1070
2. US Biofuels: 250
3. VeraSun Energy Corporation: 230
4. Hawkeye Renewables: 220
Note: Farmer owned ethanol plants accounted for 39% of total capacity.

Dairy Processors in U.S. and Canada

Annual Sales
1. Dean Foods: $10,106 Million
2. Kraft Foods: $4,400 Million
3. Land O'Lakes: $3,901 Million
4. Saputo Inc.: $3,461 Million

Notes: Over 40% of Saputo Inc. plants are in Canada.

U.S. Food Retailing CR5
1997: 24%
2001: 38%
2004: 46%
2005: 48%

Sales in Thousands
Supermarket200620052004Change
'04-'06
1)Wal-Mart$ 98,745,400$ 79,704,300$66,465,10048.57%
2)Kroger$ 58,544,668$ 54,161,588$46,314,84026.41%
3)Albertson's$ 36,287,940$ 36,733,840$31,961,80013.54%
4)Safeway$ 32,732,960$ 29,359,408$29,572,14010.69%
5)Ahold$ 23,848,240$ 21,052,200$25,105,600-5.01%

Top U.S. Food Processors

2005 Food Sales ($millions)
1. Tyson Foods Inc. 23,899
2. Kraft Foods Inc. 23,293
3 Pepsico Inc. 21,186
4. Nestle (US & Canada) 19,941
5. Anheuser-Busch Cos. Inc. 11,546
6. Dean Foods Co. 10,505
7. General Mills 9,803
8. Smithfield Foods Inc. 9,614
9. ConAgra Foods Inc. 8,195
10. Swift & Company 7,847

Commodities Grown
All numbers are taken from the PDF "Commodities in U.S. by Acreage 2008" from the National Agricultural Statistics Service. All numbers given are the number of acres planted (as opposed to harvested) unless specified.

Of all of our commodities grown, here is the percent each one makes up in acres planted:

Crop
Corn:
Soybeans:
Wheat:
Hay:
Cotton:
Sorghum:
Barley:
Oats:
Rice:
Sunflower:
Peanuts:
Sugarbeets:
Canola:
Potatoes:
Sugarcane:
Flaxseed:
Tobacco:
Safflower:
Sweet Potatoes:
2007
29.25%
19.89%
18.89%
19.26%
3.38%
2.41%
1.26%
1.18%
0.86%
0.64%
0.38%
0.40%
0.37%
0.36%
0.27%
0.11%
0.11%
0.06%
0.03%
2008
26.95%
23.00%
19.58%
18.65%
2.58%
2.24%
1.27%
1.07%
0.89%
0.67%
0.45%
0.33%
0.31%
?
0.27%
0.11%
0.10%
0.06%
0.03%
Change in Acres Planted '07-'08
-7%
+17%
+5%
-2%
-15%
-6%
+3%
-8%
+5%
+5%
+19%
-15%
-15%
?
-1%
-2%
-4%
+6%
+3%

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Oh, one more statistic: (4.00 / 3)
Presidents elected with middle name of Hussein: 1

"I can understand someone from Iowa promoting corn and soy, but we are not feeding the world, we are feeding animals and soft drink companies." - Jim Goodman

LOL! You might as well say: African-Americans having been (4.00 / 3)
elected President to date in the USA: 1. That one is a huge step forward.

Sic Transit Gloria Locavore!



[ Parent ]
Wow... (4.00 / 3)
Amazing roundup!

(No Monsanto, I'm not talking about your poison...)

The GMO trends are unsettling, as are these numbers -

Where We Buy Our Food
Outlet Type 1986 1996 2006
Conventional Supermarkets 65.3 58.2 57.7
Other Grocery
(Small, neighborhood stores) 14.3 15.8 3.4
Specialty Food Stores 5.8 2.6 2.7
Supercenters and wholesale club stores
(SuperTarget, Wal-Mart Supercenter) 0.4 4.3 17.9
Mass merchandise stores

(Target, Wal-Mart) 1.5 2.1 1.7
Convenience Stores 3.3 3.0 2.9
Home deliveries/mail order 1.2 2.8 3.8
Farmers/processors/wholesalers 2.0 1.9 0.8
Other Stores 6.2 10.1 9.2

Besides the fact that most of the 'food' purchased at these places is crap, these big boxes are going to be the very first places to cease to exist when the dinosaur juice starts to run low...


Meat industry concentration (4.00 / 3)
Here are two related to the meat industry:  

* 79.2 percent of steers and heifers were slaughtered by the 4 largest firms in 2006.  In 1980 the number was only 35.7.
* 62.8 percent of hogs were slaughtered by the 4 largest firms in 2006.  In 1980 the number was only 33.6.

These numbers, and many other indications of the increasing levels of concentration in the meat industry, are in Report SR-08-1 from the UDSA's Grain Inspection, Packers and Stockyards Administration (PDF).

The increasing concentration is bad news for farmers with small herds and for consumers, as Tom Philpott has explained at Gristmill in his Meat Wagon column.


omg, you are SO RIGHT (4.00 / 2)
thanks.

"I can understand someone from Iowa promoting corn and soy, but we are not feeding the world, we are feeding animals and soft drink companies." - Jim Goodman

[ Parent ]
Usda home loan (0.00 / 0)
To qualify for a USDA home loan the applicant's family income must range 50 % to 80% of area median income. This range is applicable for very low income rates.
Sanction of USDA loan:
Buying a home with usda home loan realized by generally the rural department officer visits the farm house or agricultural land of the applicant. Then he goes through various documents of the applicants to ensure that the declarations made by the applicant are true. At last he makes the approval thereby writing sanction letter to the head of USDA for qualifying the USDA loan for the concerned applicant.

Turkey Industry CR4
1998: 31%
1992: 35%
1996: 40%
2000: 45%
2005: 51%
2007: 55%

+
2009: 59% ( i know )

don't changed so far.


# of national TV shows dedicated to Health and Sustainability: 0 (0.00 / 0)
Do you think it would be great to have a TV show about Health and Sustainability?  Below is one way we might get this off the ground.

We Americans are unhealthy in part because so many things are stacked up against us. We are surrounded by chemicals on our food and in our homes. Conflicting information has us confused about what is healthy and what is not. And, those with the power to protect us are not up to the job. So let's do it ourselves! Let's have a TV show that aims to arm Americans with information to make healthy choices. We'll look at the good the bad and the ugly of farming, food and chemicals. We'll explore industry practices and public policies to learn what is helping us and what is not. And, we'll cut through obfuscation and hype and find out which research is really worth our attention. Together, we can take responsibility for our health!

Click the link below to vote for a Health and Sustainability focused Talk Show.

http://myown.oprah.com/auditio...


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